Idiom: the devil is in the details

Definition: the details are very complicated; things look nice on the surface, but the details are bad Examples: The new building looks nice, but the landlord might be trying to trick us. Read the contract carefully. The devil is in the details. I thought the agreement sounded good. However, later that day, when I read

Idiom: to rack up (something)

Definition: to add up, to accumulate Examples: The shipping container is stuck in Customs. Every day it is delayed, the shipping company charges us money. We are really racking up a lot of demmurage charges. Don’t pay the invoices late. When an invoice is late, our vendors charge us fees. If we are late, we

Idiom: light at the end of the tunnel

Definition: the end of bad times; good results coming from hard times Examples: It’s been really busy lately, and I am working 80 hours per week. But soon a slower time will come — I can see the light at the end of the tunnel. These production problems never end. The machines keep breaking, the

Idiom: to turn the corner

Definition: to change (usually in a good way) Examples: Sales have been down for three years, but now they are increasing. I think we finally turned the corner. This ERP implementation has taken so long to finish, much longer than we expected. But I think we finally turned the corner, and we will finish soon.

Idiom: to stand on the sidelines

Definition: to not participate, to watch but not do Examples: Murat and Ahmet are having a big fight. I am going to stand on the sidelines, I am not going to get involved. The company is going through hard times. Get involved with the rescue, don’t just sit and watch. If you just stand on

Idiom: come hell or high water

Definition: regardless of difficulties or obstacles Examples: The market is in a big crisis, but we are determined to succeed. Come hell or high water, we will dominate the market. This project is really important. I have to finish it, no matter what happens. My boss told me, “Come hell or high water, you have

Idiom: to move mountains

Definition: to do something difficult; to do something impossible Examples: My boss asked me to save the failed project, but it was already too late, the project was completely dead. I told him sorry, but I can’t move mountains. Changing a company culture is like moving mountains — very difficult, very tiring, and highly likely